Archive for the ‘Rumi’ Category

Learn About Love From Poet Rumi

March 3, 2008
In this modern age of technology, busy lifestyles, and obsession with consumerism have taken a lot of the romance and love out of our lives. The Internet has become a medium to connect with people as everyone is finding it a lot harder to meet one another in the ‘real’ world. It has undeniably also become a place of voyeuristic fantasy in the realms of sexuality on pornographic sites. What ever happened to true love? Are our priorities so messed up that romance has been forgotten, only to be experienced vicariously through television and movies? The answer is no. Romance will never die; we just have to feed it with our energy.Around 800 years ago a famous Arabic poet, philosopher and sage named Rumi wrote beautiful love poetry beyond all comparison. I don’t know if there have been many other people in Earth’s history that have thought about love as much as this master. His poems have not been forgotten, and one place you can simply find and read them is on the Internet. E.g. http://www.khamush.com/love_poems.html

The beauty of the heart
The beauty of the heart
is the lasting beauty:
its lips give to drink
of the water of life.
Truly it is the water,
that which pours,
and the one who drinks.
All three become one when
your talisman is shattered.
That oneness you can’t know
by reasoning. (Rumi)

Of course you can also buy books by Rumi on the Net as well, but the main point here is that the Internet doesn’t just give us access to our present time and place; it gives us a means to connect with past realities often assumed to be lost in time. It is quite ironic and paradoxical that we can use this modern space age tool to connect with our cultural, spiritual and social heritages. We as a society have come a long way in terms of our technological development, but it is well known throughout the world that our ancestors were much more evolved in these important areas where our growth has become stunted due to a lack of awareness and narrow perspectives on life.

Love, romance, spirituality, none of these things need be forgotten. The answers aren’t locked away in tombs and pyramids; they are still here lingering in the back of our consciousness. All we need to do is to get the desire to fulfil our lives by these means and we will search and find the ways. Human beings are incredibly resourceful creatures. When we put our minds to something we can make just about anything happen. I don’t want to imply that the answers to our problems are easy, or that the Internet is our sole saviour. I am just amazed at how all things in life are connected, and that we just have to open our eyes to see the all too obvious!

Jesse S. Somer
http://www.m6.net
Jesse S. Somer is a writer searching for Cupid’s arrows anywhere possible. He has found that the modern Internet to be a possible source of ancient knowledge and wisdom.

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Rumi Poet of Love

March 3, 2008
Jalalud’din Rumi is one of the world’s most revered mystical poets. During his lifetime he produced a prolific range of inspiring and devotional poetry which encapsulates the sufi’s experience of union with the divine. These timeless classics have enjoyed a renaissance in recent years, as Rumi has become one of our most popular poets. Although Rumi was a Sufi and a great scholar of the Qu’ran his appeal reaches across religious and social divisions. Even during his lifetime he was noted for his cosmopolitan outlook. His funeral, which lasted 40 days, was attended by Muslims, Jews, Persians, Christians and Greeks.Rumi was born in 1207 on the Eastern shores of the Persian Empire. He was born in the city of Balkh (in what is now Afghanistan), and finally settled in the town of Konya, in what is now Turkey. It was a period of remarkable social and political turbulence. The 13th Century was the era of the crusades; also the area where Rumi lived was under constant threat of Mongol invasion. The great upheavals Rumi faced during his life is said to have influenced much of his poetry.Rumi met many of the great Sufi poets. For example, as a young boy he met the Sufi Master, Attar. Attar is said to have commented about Rumi.”There goes a river dragging an ocean behind it.”However the most important turning point in Rumi’s life was when he met the wandering dervish Shams al- Din. Shams was eccentric and unorthodox, but was filled with heart – felt devotion, that sometimes he couldn’t contain. Shams appeared to be quite different to the respectable and prestigious scholar, (as Rumi was at that point.) However Rumi saw in Shams a divine presence. This meeting and their close mystical relationship was instrumental in awakening Rumi’s latent spirituality and intense devotion. It was at this point Rumi abandoned his academic career and began to write his mystical poetry.

Rumi’s poetry is wide ranging and encompasses many different ideas but behind all the poetry the essential theme was the longing and searching for the union with the divine. Rumi was himself a great mystic. His outpourings of poetry were a reflection of his own inner consciousness. Ironically Rumi said that no words could adequately explain the experience of mystical union. Yet his words are inspiring signposts which point towards the divine.

In his poetry Rumi frequently uses imagery which may be unexpected. For example although Islam forbids alcohol, he often describes the sensation of being “drunk and intoxicated with ecstasy for his beloved.” Here drunk implies the bliss of the divine consciousness. Love is a frequent subject of Rumi’s poems, descriptions of seeming romantic love is an illusion to the all encompassing pure, divine love. Metaphors such as this are common to other Sufi poets such as Omar Khayyam, Hafiz, and Attar.

UNESCO has announced that the year 2007 will be the International Rumi Year, during which special ceremonies and programs will be held all over the world to commemorate this great Persian poet. Rumi’s poetry is so widely appreciated because it has the capacity to uplift our own consciousness. Reading the words of Rumi can awaken in ourselves, our own spiritual self.

Richard is an editor of Poet Seers a collection of spiritual and illumining poetry. Richard studies meditation through the teachings of Sri Chinmoy who is also a noted poet.